Lincoln Green Scene Lincoln.NE.USA.Earth

abluegirl:

Living Wall

These vegetated surfaces don’t just look pretty. They have other benefits as well, including cooling city blocks, reducing loud noises, and improving a building’s energy efficiency.What’s more, a recent modeling study shows that green walls can potentially reduce large amounts of air pollution in what’s called a “street canyon,” or the corridor between tall buildings.

For the study, Thomas Pugh, a biogeochemist at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany, and his colleagues created a computer model of a green wall with generic vegetation in a Western European city. Then they recorded chemical reactions based on a variety of factors, such as wind speed and building placement.

The simulation revealed a clear pattern: A green wall in a street canyon trapped or absorbed large amounts of nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter—both pollutants harmful to people, said Pugh. Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.Compared with reducing emissions from cars, little attention has been focused on how to trap or take up more of the pollutants, added Pugh, whose study was published last year in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

That’s why the green-wall study is “putting forward an alternative solution that might allow [governments] to improve air quality in these problem hot spots,” he said.

Full Gallery

(via secretrepublic)

unconsumption:

urbangreens:

submitted by Louise Faulkner

Source here, @Louiseann666, apparently, on Instagram.

Cool way to garden without a lot of space.

unconsumption:

urbangreens:

submitted by Louise Faulkner

Source here, @Louiseann666, apparently, on Instagram.

Cool way to garden without a lot of space.

The existing portions of the Keystone XL pipeline saw fourteen spills in its first year of operation

thegreenurbanist:

When the State Department issued its first environmental review, it said “there could be from 1.18 to 1.83 spills greater than 2,100 gallons per year” for the entire project and helpfully added that “crude oil spills are not likely to have toxic effects on the general public.”

Yet, the existing portions of the Keystone pipeline sawfourteen spillsin the first year of operation, and there have beenmore sincethen. Dr. John Stansbury of the University of Nebraska conducted the firstindependent analysisof the Keystone XL pipeline and found a likelihood at the high end of the State Department estimate—1.8 spills per year, or ninety-one over the next fifty years—but strongly contested the contention that it wouldn’t be harmful to the public.

If a spill happened where the pipeline crosses the Platte River, Stansbury noted, benzene—a human carcinogen—would travel unabated down the Missouri River for several hundred miles and affect the drinking water for hundreds of thousands of people in cities like Lincoln, Omaha and Nebraska City in Nebraska and St. Joseph and Kansas City in Missouri.”

Think they are counting clean-up jobs in their numbers argument? 

(Source: thenationmagazine)

paperwok:

American Plastic: American Gothic rendered in plastic by Australian artist Jane Gillings

paperwok:

American Plastic: American Gothic rendered in plastic by Australian artist Jane Gillings

(via dougbrealtor)

unconsumption:

Above: Peter McFarlane’s Circuit Board Work

I recently saw the 60 Minutes documentary “The Electronic Wasteland”, about the unscrupulous disposal of toxic computer garbage, and now I’m determined to cling to my iPhone for as long as humanly possible, until it’s utterly unusable. Despite these efforts to control my e-waste footprint, none of it means that my iJunk won’t end up in the pile eventually anyway.
But there must be some way to stop this! If only everyone creatively recycled their dead and dying computer devices. With a little bit of imagination, making “yesterday’s latest technology” into beautiful pieces of art is a nice way to avoid sending the stuff off to fester in a developing country. Here are examples of eight artworks that give us an idea of the range of possibilities for what old computers, cellphones, televisions, and common electronic parts can become.

More: 8 Projects Turning Deadly E-waste Into Beautiful, Non-deadly Works Of Art | The Creators Project

unconsumption:

Above: Peter McFarlane’s Circuit Board Work

I recently saw the 60 Minutes documentary “The Electronic Wasteland”, about the unscrupulous disposal of toxic computer garbage, and now I’m determined to cling to my iPhone for as long as humanly possible, until it’s utterly unusable. Despite these efforts to control my e-waste footprint, none of it means that my iJunk won’t end up in the pile eventually anyway.

But there must be some way to stop this! If only everyone creatively recycled their dead and dying computer devices. With a little bit of imagination, making “yesterday’s latest technology” into beautiful pieces of art is a nice way to avoid sending the stuff off to fester in a developing country. Here are examples of eight artworks that give us an idea of the range of possibilities for what old computers, cellphones, televisions, and common electronic parts can become.

More: 8 Projects Turning Deadly E-waste Into Beautiful, Non-deadly Works Of Art | The Creators Project

sciencecenter:

All of this hurricane talk has put me in the mood to talk about global warming…
(Source)

sciencecenter:

All of this hurricane talk has put me in the mood to talk about global warming…

(Source)

(Source: jimharris.com, via dougbrealtor)

alexanderpf:

Networks and complexity. Organizations and societies evolved from tribes to institutions to markets to networks, each stage triggered by major societal changes in communications. The written word enabled institutions, the printed word fostered regional and global markets, and the digital word is empowering worldwide networks.
via ibmsocialbiz

alexanderpf:

Networks and complexity. Organizations and societies evolved from tribes to institutions to markets to networks, each stage triggered by major societal changes in communications. The written word enabled institutions, the printed word fostered regional and global markets, and the digital word is empowering worldwide networks.

via ibmsocialbiz

unconsumption:

0 to 1, a New York City-based design and architecture studio, uses “the remnants of industrial manufacturing” to create furniture and other objects.
C-clamps and cardboard cores that “were once used to hold fabric or packaging materials” get made into “Cylinder” chairs.
See also: Earlier Unconsumption posts on new uses for cardboard tubes here, and paper towel and other tubes here.

unconsumption:

0 to 1, a New York City-based design and architecture studio, uses “the remnants of industrial manufacturing” to create furniture and other objects.

C-clamps and cardboard cores that “were once used to hold fabric or packaging materials” get made into “Cylinder” chairs.

See also: Earlier Unconsumption posts on new uses for cardboard tubes here, and paper towel and other tubes here.

commanderspock: razorshapes:

Bridges usually go right over water – they don’t even touch the surface. Surprisingly, if you submerge the vast majority of the structure under water, allowing pedestrians to effectively travel between the waves, it makes the whole experience of using a bridge much more exciting. Moses may have thought of it but it’s taken about 3,000 years for us to catch up, all thanks to Dutch architects Ro & Ad.

(via rogue-herring-deactivated201306)